The Microbiota, the Gut and the Brain in Eating and Alcohol Use Disorders: A ‘Ménage à Trois’?

Accumulating evidence on the influence of the gut microbiota on bidirectional communication along the gut-brain axis suggests a role for the gut microbiota in eating disorders (EDs) and alcohol and substance use disorders. The potential influence of altered gut microbiota (dysbiosis) on behaviors associated with such disorders may have implications for the development of therapeutic interventions.

Some studies suggest that dysbiosis and gut microbial byproducts may influence the pathophysiology of EDs through direct and indirect interference with peptide hormone signaling. In addition, dysbiosis has been shown to correlate with symptoms associated with alcohol consumption, i.e., cravings, depression, and anxiety. Finally, a study in mice suggests that manipulations in the gut microbiota may influence cocaine-related behaviors.


Alcohol and Alcoholism: The Microbiota, the Gut and the Brain in Eating and Alcohol Use Disorders: A ‘Ménage à Trois’?

Found at Alkohol adé (german)

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